Venting and Letting It Go

As a lifetime partner with my hubby and caregiver for my two dogs, I deal with a lot of “stuff”; but this post isn’t about the dogs. It’s not even about my hubby. It’s about human specialized medical practices.

And, as the title of this post suggests, I’m just going to vent my frustrations and then let them go.

My main frustration is with the power that hospital systems have over doctors and their ability to meet their patients’ special needs. And then there’s the frustration with doctors who take it personally when their patients refuse referral to another specialist 200 miles away just because of their particular hospital affiliation.

That recently happened to us (a second time) this past week. Hubby’s gastroenterologist wants him to see a specialist 200 miles away. We explained to him – as politely as we could – that we cannot and will not travel that far. We are not about to inflict the physical, mental, emotional and financial hardships upon ourselves that would come with such travel. Surely there are other esophageal specialists much closer to home to whom he could refer us. Despite our refusal, this doctor – who has been treating hubby’s gastric issues for a minimum of 15 years – has his office set up an appointment with said specialist. When we received the appointment notice, we called the local doctor and told his nurse, in no uncertain terms, that we are NOT traveling 200 miles to see said specialist. A few days later, the nurse called back and said that the doctor was referring us back to our primary care physician for this and all future gastroenterology issues. In other words, unless you go see the specialist affiliated with our hospital, you are no longer our patient.

Whatever happened to compassion and working with the patient to assure that all his/her needs are met, including the emotional needs that go hand-in-hand with the medical needs?? Apparently, the Hippocratic oath they all take – or at least used to take – does not count for s**t any more when they sign an affiliation contract with a particular hospital system.

Okay, so I’ve vented my frustrations with the medical care system in this country. Now it’s time to let it go. Thanks for letting me bend your ear for a few minutes.

12 thoughts on “Venting and Letting It Go

  1. Dakota/Caren/Cody says:

    That is simply horrific and my heart goes out to you. i don’t blame you one bit for not wanting to drive 200 miles away. I would NEVER do that. It is deplorable that a doctor who cared for your husband for 15 years would let you go simply because of your not wanting to drive 200 miles to a doctor that he referred. That is simply deplorable. Actually it is downright WRONG and horrific. I am so sorry you are going through this!

    Liked by 1 person

    • My Golden Life says:

      Hi Caren! I don’t know that it was the doctor’s choice. The healthcare delivery system in this country has been hijacked by the insurance companies and hospital systems. They don’t allow doctors to practice common-sense medicine any more. So-called “managed care” drives up our costs and puts more money in their coffers. That’s why they fight so hard against universal health care. But, alas, there are other gastroenterologists here in Greenville and our PCP will be referring us to one of them.

      Like

  2. easyweimaraner says:

    the health front is a place full of disappointment… hugs to you and all the best…. we had a nuclear meltdown too… we have one ear specialist in our area… called for an appointment… got one in OCTOBER 2019… nice…

    Liked by 1 person

  3. edgar62 says:

    Ok. The post you see is an addition to the original post – something I forgot to mention – which on its own does not really make sense. I do not know what happened to the original post but it seems to have vanished. — this is it –
    When Annabell ( My wife) was very ill she was flown down to the Royal Adelaide Hospital for specialized care. She was there for six weeks before she was moved to another hospital where she stayed for a further three weeks before Andrew – my son- and I went down to pick her up and bring her home. For some time after that, I had to take her back to Adelaide for tests and check-ups- a round trip of some 800 klms and an overnight stay. Because of the isolation of many country patients the State Government, years ago, initiated a system called “Patient Assisted Transport Scheme” – PATS for short. With this scheme the government paid part of the costs of a country patient travelling to and from Adelaide for specialized treatment – some assistance with accommodation and some assistance if a carer was require. Our hospital is a regional country hospital.and we have a number of specialists who come here on a regular basis to hold clinics. I, of course, went down to Adelaide as often as I could to visit Annabell and generally stayed overnight – this was not covered by PATS.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Tails Around the Ranch says:

    Healthcare would be laughable if it weren’t to dang frustrating. I share your thoughts and hope venting helps you as you navigate. It’s quite interesting that as patients (and consumers of healthcare) far too many providers don’t bother to listen to our concerns. Sending oodles of poodles of hugs and tail wags your way. 🤗(( ))

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Jan K says:

    Ugh, don’t even get me started on the state of health care in this country. Sorry you’ve had to deal with this, and hope ultimately you and Sam find a better doctor anyway. It’s tough enough dealing with health issues, never mind adding the exhaustion of having to travel for it too; they should understand that. Glad you were able to vent!!

    Liked by 2 people

    • My Golden Life says:

      Well, we’re going to see our primary physician tomorrow – we have the same one – who happens to be affiliated with the same hospital as all of Sam’s other doctors except the one in question. I’m pretty sure there is at least one gastroenterology practice affiliated with the same hospital here in Greenville.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. derrycats says:

    That all sucks. The medical system in this country is very broken, and the insurance companies, and not doctors, are running the show. It needs fixing. I’m so sorry for what they are putting you through.

    Liked by 2 people

    • My Golden Life says:

      Not just the insurance companies – the hospitals are in cohoots with them. But, yes, the system is broken. Our original PCP retired last March because he was fed up with the crap. He was a very independent-minded family practitioner who believed in common-sense treatment, not the so-called “managed care” BS that the insurance companies demanded. And hubby and I loved him for it.

      Liked by 1 person

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